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21 January 2008

Comments

Luther

Excellent point Dean, and, i have to say I agree, he can't discard his Mom being white and should never deny his white side. That said, in this country, th term biracial seems to be moot, since what people see is what you are.

And, I sure hope that you are on the front lines of the virulent racism within the gay community.

Cadence

Dean, it's not racist to say Obama is Black, if that's how he labels himself. I hate when people say he is Black because that is how society sees him; in my opinion that's bigoted. But there is no issue if he is the one who steps out and says his race is Black. And it's not up to you or anyone else to try and alter that label.

Mark Norris

This is why I love this man. He is one of the few leaders that courageously speaks out against homophobia.

Mark Norris

This is why I love this man. He is one of the few leaders that courageously speaks out against homophobia.

Luther

Cadence, I don't consider myself "bigoted" but, its not as if he can say he is "white" when he looks black, and, the history of this country, past and present says that if you look black, you are. And, even though he is half black, and, takes that as his persona, more power to him, just like I say about Halle Berry, but, I do not think its fair to call someone a "bigot" for seeing the US in the real way it is, and, its still black and white, with few shades of grey.

Rod McCullom

This comment thread is careening into a debate on racial politics. That was not the intent of the post.

Cadence is correct. Barack Obama is bi-racial, and, has described himself as "black" or "African-American" and chooses to self-identify with the black community. If you read his books (hint: one is being advertised on this blog), he talks in detail about his journey of self-awareness, and, why he chose this route. Or, you can just listen to any speech and hear the senator express himself in those terms or express affinity with the community.

Jimmy

Him calling himself black is racist?
Since when?

At any rate, I'm glad that Obama addressed the issue. Points for him.

Andy Niable

Great speech, and certainly not the safest political move so close to South Carolina's primary. But very courageous.

I ask: if Hillary gave the same speech to a primarily Black or other "minority" crowd, would she be seen as trying to address the problem, or condescending and criticizing?

More importantly, WOULD she give such a speech on that subject in that particular context?

Sometimes the messenger is important as the message.

If you were moved by the speech, get busy and find your caucus location or the date of your primary... even if you don't vote for Obama. Get involved.

Derrick from Philly

Dean:

The "one drop" doctrine was the only good thing to come out of slavery. If the Brazilians believed in the "one drop" rule, black & brown (& yella') Brazilians wouldn't be second citizens in the nation they built. The white parent or grandparents should be recognized if they treated the child well, but our society has dictated for 300 years what that child's racial identity is. Don't let no light-skinned black child go around believing he is white, he'll get his ass and his soul kicked.

Racism has to do with believing your race is superior to another. Very few black, Asian, African, Native American, Arab people on this Earth can honestly believe they are superior to the white men who ruled them for 400 years. Maybe the Japanese can, but that's about it. We can be bigots, but I don't think we can be racists.

At this point we (Democrats & Progressives) have to take the great historic chance with either Obama or Clinton. I'm starting to get the "spirit of hope" but, it's still a huge risk... so be it.

Redd

I am intrigued by the implications of Andy's question. Is it just me, or does it seem to anyone else that Obama directs all of his finger-waving and preaching about homophobia, anti-semitism, and anti-immigrant sentiment toward an African American audience? I'm not saying that these aren't important issues to deal with, but was Obama carrying this torch when he won in Iowa? For some reason, this rubs me the wrong way. And to return briefly to his comments on Omar from the Wire, it still seems ambiguous to me whether Obama doesn't give a full "endorsement" because the character is gay or because he's a criminal.

Redd

I am intrigued by the implications of Andy's question. Is it just me, or does it seem to anyone else that Obama directs all of his finger-waving and preaching about homophobia, anti-semitism, and anti-immigrant sentiment toward an African American audience? I'm not saying that these aren't important issues to deal with, but was Obama carrying this torch when he won in Iowa? For some reason, this rubs me the wrong way. And to return briefly to his comments on Omar from the Wire, it still seems ambiguous to me whether Obama doesn't give a full "endorsement" because the character is gay or because he's a criminal.

Doug Cooper-Spencer

Thanks for this piece, Rod. Finally, I am able to form a bond with Obama. Until this piece I simply felt a strong distrust for him when it comes to defending gay rights. He's not where I want him to be yet (supporting gay marriage), but this speech definitely makes up for 'McClurkingate'. I wonder how the homophobes will relate to him now?

Mel Smith

Mr. Obama greatly helped us out.

The comments to this entry are closed.

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